Press

MPI solutions and research are frequently featured in a number of financial and investment media outlets.

Broken Trust, Texas’ huge school endowment pays out less and less for schoolchildren

“One way to look at a fund’s performance is by its growth in market value. Another way is to examine its returns. Analysts at Markov Processes International, a global investment research and technology firm, estimated that the fund was performing comparable to the worst-performing Ivy League endowments. One hundred dollars invested in the top-performing Ivy League endowments about a decade ago would be worth roughly $250 now. The Ivy average came in at about $220. The same cash put in the Permanent School Fund would now be valued at about $190. Read the full article here.

Bad Manager Picks Have Sunk Pensions’ Bet on Alts

“Public pension funds aren’t the only institutions to fail to benefit from the heady promise of alternatives. The performance of Ivy League endowments has trailed a passive portfolio of 60 percent U.S. stocks and 40 percent bonds over the past ten years — and has been more volatile to boot, according to a report from research and analytics provider Markov Processes International.” Read the full article here.

Opalesque Exclusive: Investors Grow Wary as Market Risks Rise

“More than one third (38%) of respondents listed slower growth as the biggest risk in 2019, a significant jump from March, when 12 percent of respondents listed it as the top risk. Two other top investor concerns for 2019 are rising interest rates (29%) and a stock market reversal (21%). The results come on the heels of a separate report from the White House that the US government shutdown could eventually push the US economy into recession if it persists. “What we’re starting to see from investors is a growing interest in so-called uncorrelated strategies like global macro managed futures,” said Rohtas Handa, EVP, Head of Institutional Solutions at MPI in an interview with Opalesque. “There’s a desire to reposition portfolios so that they are insulated if the volatility we experienced in December is a more consistent theme in 2019.”” Read the full article here. (subscription required)

A Fine Balance Leads to Successful Long-Term Investing

In the 1990s, it pioneered a strategy that has since become the preferred approach for the endowments of many of the continent’s top universities and foundations. The Yale model consists of pouring money into opportunities that aren’t as thoroughly picked over as public stock and bond markets–areas such as timberland, hedge funds and private-equity deals. In theory, this makes sense. Investors should derive a reward for taking on the additional work and risk that goes along with venturing into the dimmer corners of the financial markets. But in practice the Yale model has been inconsistent. It beat a 60/40 approach during its early years; more recently, it’s looked strictly ho-hum. In fact, over the past 10 years, the endowments for Yale and all the other Ivy League schools in the United States failed to match the performance of a standard 60/40 portfolio, according to a recent study by (MPI), an investment research and software firm. Read the full article here. (subscription required)

Why the Ivy League Clings to a Strategy of Diminishing Returns

“With $136 billion in assets and enviable access to exclusive investment opportunities, Ivy League universities have long boasted that their endowments earn higher returns than other investors. Not anymore. This year the 10-year returns achieved by the endowments for all the Ivy League schools lagged a plain-vanilla portfolio of stocks and bonds, according to a new study by Markov Processes International, which closely monitors the performance of Ivy League endowments. It’s the first time that has happened in the 16 years for which Markov has data on all the Ivy League endowments.” Read the full article here. (subscription required)

Ivy League Endowments Lag 60-40 Portfolio

“Despite reporting strong returns for the second straight year, Ivy League university endowments have lagged behind a simple portfolio comprised of 60% stocks and 40% bonds over the past 10 years, according to a report from Markov Processes International. The report said that from fiscal year 2009 to 2018, a portfolio made up of 60% stocks and 40% fixed income had annualized returns of 8.1%. Meanwhile not even the top-performing Ivy League endowments beat this over the same time period as Columbia University and Princeton University’s endowments were a shade behind with annualized returns of 8.0% each.” Read the full article here.

This Incredibly Simple Investing Strategy Beat Every Ivy League Endowment Over the Past Decade

“Helped along by one of the stock market’s best runs, a humble 60/40 stock-bond portfolio built from low-cost index funds would have outperformed all Ivy endowments for the past 10 years through July, according to the new report by investment researcher Markov Processes International.” Read the full article here.

How Ivy League Endowment Performance Stacked Up

“Ivy League endowments continued their strong performance in fiscal 2018 (ended June 30), with all but one registering double-digit returns and all beating a 60–40 U.S. stocks-and-bonds portfolio, the research and analytics firm Markov Processes International reported last week. However, for the first time in the 20 years of available Ivy endowment returns data, the 60–40 portfolio outpaced all Ivies in terms of 10-year performance. For 15- and 20-year performance, the Ivies still maintained an edge on the benchmark.” Read the full article here.

Not One Ivy League Endowment Beat a Simple U.S. 60-40 Portfolio Over Ten Years

“There’s a tug of war going on in endowments, as well as in asset management,” said Jeff Schwartz, president of MPI. “A lot of people are hoping that there is no point in investing in these complex alternatives. Then you have devotees of the Yale model who want to show there is a payoff for putting so much of the portfolio into private equity, VC, and all the things we think of as sophisticated and expensive. This report shows that the reality is much more complex than either narrative.” Read the full article here.

MPI Launches Target Volatility Indices for Hedge Fund Trackers

“I think it’s an extension of what we have done before. We launched our hedge fund benchmarks with daily tracker indices to provide a better measure of hedge fund performance while also providing insight on what the drivers of returns are,” said Rohtas Handa, EVP and Head of Institutional Solutions at MPI. “While traditional hedge fund indices give a measure of overall performance, there isn’t a focus on what is driving constituent returns. So, we are excited to deliver these new insights.” Read the full article here.